Herters Does Not Apply USER.d1c47d8c-ed6f-4419-8c8a-01f55e653c54 Herter's Super No.3, 3A / U /O3 / reloading press, upgrade Primer Catcher Does not apply
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Herter's Super No.3, 3A / U /O3 / reloading press, upgrade Primer Catcher

Herter's Super No.3, 3A / U /O3 / reloading press, upgrade Primer Catcher

$15.73
$18.5 (15% off)
About this Item
Available stock:12
Location: Jacksonville, Florida

Returns: Not Accepted
Condition: New
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MPN : [Does Not Apply]
Press Type : [Single Stage]
Type : [Reloading Press]
Brand : [Herters]
UPC : [Does not apply]
Model : [super 3]
Item Specifics
eBay
Herter's Super No. 3 reloading press, upgrade Primer Catcher  

NOTE: THIS IS FOR THE PRIMER CATCHER, NOT THE PRESS.

 Now catching the spent primers with this device will mean lot less mess dealing with the old primers and trays!

This item is designed to Fit the Herter's super No 3, 3A, U, O3 presses.

Spent primers fall down the ram into the director which then makes
them fall into the catcher and out of the catcher tube exit.

Very easy slip in place design. 
Magnets on bottom of catcher help hold it in place, but you will need to remove your primer lever
 and use a bolt as seen in the pictures above, to hold it in place.
Magnetic Ram Primer director included.

The collection tube has been designed to use a 1/2" I.D. tubing. 
(Tubing not included, but can be got at any hardware store. This is to save you cost on shipping is a larger box)


NOTE: PRESS AND CLEAR TUBE NOT INCLUDED
AUCTION IS FOR PLASTIC PRIMER CATCHER ONLY, NOT THE PRESS.

Note: Made with 3d printer so may have some small imperfections, but overall looks great

Other model primer catcher available in my ebay store (click logo by my user name)

P.S. If you do not want to wait on the auction to end YOU can BUY IT NOW in my ebay store.

Thanks for looking

Customer Reviews

Four and Half Stars
4.7 out of 5 stars based on 17 reviews
Five Stars
Tiny and sturdy
First. This device (and all inReach actually) will not work without a subscription. The subscription is what allows it to connect to the Iridium satellite network. In other words, without a subscription is just a regular GPS (without maps) and a digital compass. Since the SOS button will not work without a subscription, if you are not comfortable paying for one, this device is not for you. First impressions: The inReach mini is tiny and feels sturdy. The screen is pretty similar to the one on the fenix watches, which is incredibly easy to read in direct sunlight (I will have to make a side by side comparison). The box contains a carabiner and the Garmin attachment that you can use with other mounts, such as a car, bike, etc. I discovered that you couldn't have it connected to a computer and use it at the same time. BUT, you can charge it and use it without issues. The activation process is easy to follow and without weird steps.Now, you can provide fast updates to your family/friends using the preset messages. You can pre-program, on the inReach web, three preset messages that you can send for free, even if you have the most basic plan. You can have other premade messages, which although you have to pay for, you can quickly select them from the device, making it entirely independent of a smartphone. Although, if you want to type a message, the smartphone application (Earthmate) will be faster for this, since the inReach and the fenix widget will be really slow to type in. Regardless of where do you type a message, 160 is the character limit. The inReach mini will connect to a fenix 5 series watch using ANT+. From the watch, you can check new messages, send preset messages, type one (if you are patient) and even initiate the SOS function. I found this pretty convenient since I always keep the inReach mini hanging on my backpack and with this I can check messages without stopping to manipulate the inReach. On the Earthmate app, once you log in to your Garmin account, you will be able to download Topo maps to your smartphone and use them without the need of cellular data, which is when you probably will need a topographic map. The maps available in the US are Topo North America, Open Street Map (which will also cover many areas around the world), USGS Quad Sheets, Color Aerial Imagery. For Europe and South America, Open Street Map provides an excellent option to other paid options. Also noteworthy, you only download the maps and aerial images of the areas that interest you, so you don't have to consume all your phone memory on maps. Regarding costs, the cheapest option is a "freedom plan" that you can suspend the months that you are not planning to use it and it starts at $14.95 per month, plus an annual program fee of $24.95. Keep in mind that if you plan to use it all year long, this is not the cheapest option but the annual contract for $11.95 per month. Finally, you can send a test message (for free) before leaving home to test if the device and satellite connection are working correctly.
By
Five Stars
Tiny and sturdy
I had been using a spot device and after getting a 225 dollar renewal charge from spot I had enough. I used this on a 5 day trip in the sierra Nevada mountains. It was small enough to wear on my pack strap which made it easy to check out miles for the day. Battery life wasn't bad in tracking mode I recharged it off a solar charger but I think it could have gone two days in tracking mode. miles traveled was dead on with the map trail mileage. Pairing the unit with a iphone and sending a message was pretty easy.
By
Four Stars
Not a good first impression
Relative to my old Spot Messenger, this is a 5 star device - that Messenger was an awful, unreliable product that Spot will no longer activate. I dropped a star because Garmin could really do just a few things in the software to make it perfect. But here's what is great: - Two way reliable messaging - the audio chime is a key feature to let you know you have a message or your message was sent successfully. So simple, so helpful. (It could be a little louder though) - Weather is a great feature and works perfectly. I wonder that they can continue to use DarkSky after Apple bought it and seemingly killed all API use of the service. But I guess that is their problem. - Small size, good battery life, and chargeable from micro-USB - so you can use a small solar panel or power brick to recharge. - The Freedom plans are an excellent way to handle the service and make this affordable for the seasonal backpacker. Here is what could be improved: - Add the ability to send a preset message using your phone rather than having to use the device itself. You can send a text message from your phone, but not a preset. Why? The average backpacker would clip this to the top of the pack and use a phone (much better for navigation) to interact with the device. - You should also be able to get the weather on your phone - while the InReach is workable, sending the same weather info to the phone would make it much easier to read. - The Garmin eco-system is confusing. This works with Earthmate, other devices work with Explorer. It will work with a Fenix watch, but not a Venu, except round robin through your phone for notification, although the benefits of watch interaction to me are small. And really, no one is really going to use Earthmate for navigation - there are many offline phone nav apps that are much better. This isn't a realistic backup to your phone for navigation - your backup is a paper map. This is a *messaging* app - that is what it really is, and it is great for that and they should focus the phone app on that and not clutter it with the nav features. Or, improve Earthmate to be competitive with the other phone apps. (I personally use Backcountry Navigator Pro and it is excellent) - Slow GPS acquisition relative to my phone (yes, when my phone is remote, off-grid in airplane mode) My Samsung S10e will get a fix in maybe 6 seconds, anywhere - from GPS turn-on - not with GPS left on. This is much slower - can take a few minutes sometime. Same with my Garmin Venu. - The Explorer website is slow and could be cleaned up quite a bit. It is one of those websites you need to learn - once you do it is fine (although slow as I said). My experience with this since purchase was on a solo of the North Bass trail of Grand Canyon National Park (a beast of a trail) Of the few other people I saw (6 people in 4 days) most had the same device, so it tells you something about BP acceptance - and the people on this trail are all *seriously* hardcore backpackers - not Kaibab/Bright Angel folks. (some of them were swimming the river and hiking the South Bass as well) At the rim I also met a Hayduke dude who also had one, if that tells you anything. My feeling is that if you solo in remote places with few to no people, you should get one of these.
By
Five Stars
Great Product
I took the inReach Mini on a week-long trip to the BWCA last week. I normally go to the BWCA without any means of outside communication and in 45 years of canoeing there and in Quetico I've never had an emergency that communication would have helped. But several years ago we took a rented satellite phone on a trip, and this time we took an inReach, not because we feared an emergency, but because we needed to remain in touch about things going on at home. So why not rent a satellite phone again? Because the inReach allows text communication--and you can own, rather than rent, the satellite communicator for a reasonable price. The inReach doesn't allow voice, only short text messages. Outgoing and incoming messages are limited to 160 characters and can be sent to any cellular phone or to any email account. Messages are not sent immediately from the communicator--satellite connection must be made--and there is often a 10-minute lag between texts being sent from outside and their reception on the inReach. The advantage of the inReach is that it costs only $300 to own, and you can sign up for monthly access to the satellite network for message packages ranging from $20 to $60 a month, plus a $25 yearly access fee. Monthly plans can be for as many or as few months as you would like in a given year, provided you pay the $25 access fee. I signed up for an unlimited-message $60 plan for the month of the BWCA trip. In addition to messaging, the inReach works with a normal iPhone or Android phone to provide GPS mapping and weather reports. Weather reports use DarkSky's reporting system and were basic, but sufficient for planning our days in the BWCA. The inReach's battery lasted all week used about thirty minutes a day solely for communication. At the end of the week the battery hadn't fallen below 75 percent. The inReach can be left on to passively track your route (and report it via satellite), but we did not need route tracking, nor did we want to carry the extra battery packs necessary to recharge an always-on unit used for that purpose. Now, as to use in the BWCA in particular... The inReach uses Garmin's Earthmate GPS mapping software on a phone. It's pretty good software and works nicely on the phone with or without the satellite communicator. But for the BWCA it's insufficient as a front-line mapping solution because Earthmate maps provide neither BWCA campsite locations nor portage locations or lengths. Basic weather reports require one message each (40 message pack costs $35/month). A basic weather report covers several days with three hour gaps between condition reports the first day and fewer each subsequent day. A premium report, available for a separate $1 fee, covers more days and gives more information for each day. This was helpful in the BWCA, especially the wind reports which give daily wind speed and direction information, though not more granular than day-by-day. If you've been in the BWCA you know that wind conditions are almost more important than temperature or rain conditions. Peace of mind. I've never had an emergency in the BWCA (worse than a bear eating some of our supplies), but I had a friend whose son sustained severe, third-degree burns in Quetico before satellite phones existed. God provided a team of powerful, EMT-trained canoeists to carry the boy through the night to a hospital. But having a means of getting an SOS out is reassuring, and it's one of the reasons I bought the inReach. If you're taking young children of your own, or overseeing a trip on which you're taking the children of others, I would recommend this communicator. It has a separate, distinctly-labeled, difficult-to-engage-accidentally SOS button that reports your emergency and location via satellite to an emergency center from which aid will be dispatched. Finally, on a rather mundane note, last winter all the pay phones at the BWCA's main entry points were removed, which means you can no longer call your outfitter from a payphone and thus you must either exit at the location of your outfitter, or find a house or business to call for pickup from. Our outfitter didn't inform us of this change and so we exited at the location on Seagull Lake we had always used in the past--only to find an empty pay phone booth. We were able to text the outfitter's phone number to family members in Ohio, and they called to have us picked up. Without the inReach it would have been a long walk....
By
Four Stars
Overall - excellent. Much better than the Spots I owned.
This thing is amazing! I bought an original InReach 4 years ago. This has a screen, and is a fraction of the size. It receives messages when people when people send them. In the past, you had to send a message to get the device to check for messages. This receives a message when it's sent, and has a very easy to access menu to check for messages. Sending a message without a phone isn't really that bad! Yeah, it's not a touch screen smartphone, but it's like T9 back in the day. Pretty simple. Finally, weather reports show up on the devices screen and the phone, and you can write custom messages from a linked smart phone. This thing is great!
By
Five Stars
Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) review of inReach Mini...
The media could not be loaded. What an awesome product! I had been hesitant for some time about making the purchase, but now that I own the Garmin In-Reach, I am very pleased. Literally every place I go hiking is remote and has zero cell reception. This device enables me to communicate in all the places I actually need it most for my safety and my dogs safety. If we were to become injured, I can have immediate action taken and start the process of rescue with just the push of a button. Besides the emergency aspect, I am now able to let friends and family know I am safe. They also can track me anywhere I go to basically view the progress of my adventures. The service plans range from only emergency use to unlimited text messaging. I pay $30 per month and for what that offers me, it is so worth it! Plus the device has been very easy to use and reliable.
By
Five Stars
It is INCREDIBLE!
I bought this for my trip down the Grand Canyon last fall. Not only does it maintain a great connection to satellites, the user interface with an iPhone is excellent. In the Garmin app, you send text messages in just the same manner as with a normal cell connection - the texting software looks the same and works the same. It just takes a little longer - like 1-2 minutes. The text message automatically includes gps location as well. It worked perfectly for text messaging and sending my location from the Grand Canyon. Further, the guide company and the park service rangers all agreed this device has worked very reliably for other people in the canyon. Sadly, on our trip, a participant broke his arm in a rapid, and we had to evacuate him from the trip. We were able to communicate with the outside world to arrange pickup for him at a trailhead. Also, we had a severe storm on the 3-week trip. Checking the weather forecast feature with the InReach helped us to plan our days and campsites around the worst of the storm. Lastly, I was able to text my 6 year old daughter, and she could click the link to see a satellite image of my location, which made being away from her a little easier. Another great feature is the website and account subscription. It is easy to use and clear about charges, and the best thing is that you can turn it on and off in 1-month intervals! No annual fee here. Prices are very reasonable for what you are getting. You can use it without a cellphone too, and the interface is pretty good, but a cell is easier. One last thing: a park ranger explained that this is actually BETTER than a Sat phone because the audio on a sat phone can be difficult to hear, or can cut out when it loses it's satellite, or can cut out as the battery dies. This device gets a simple clear text out, and saves you the frustration and misunderstanding that comes with bad phone connections. Makes sense. I used a solar charger to keep it charged. This device is of the highest quality and the service is just outstanding.
By
Five Stars
Gives peace of mind, and helps communicate ANY place I decide to Adventure
A friend and I did a recent backpacking trip in a remote part of Alaska. We were never going to be within 100 miles of a road, and our primary recovery by float-plane would be dependent on our proximity to a sizeable lake. We wanted to keep our families informed of our status, we wanted the DarkSky weather reports, we wanted comms with our pilots, and we thought the InReach SOS service was a nice back-up in case things truly got ugly. Here are the functions we used: 1. Pre-set text messages to family. 2. Weather reports. 3. Send/receive text messages to communicate with our pilots on extraction day. Here's how it worked: 1. If you log in to your Garmin portal and set up the pre-set messages ahead of time, these are incredibly easy to use in the field. When we configured our pre-sets, we opted to include a link to our location page. We created two pre-sets: one was a simple check-in -- we're OK and here's where we are; the other was an end-of-day, here's where we're camping message. Our family members reported that the texts were reassuring and gave a good point marked on a map, allowing them to keep track of our whereabouts and progress. From our position in western Alaska, it never seemed to take more than 3 minutes for one of the messages to transmit. 2. We downloaded a few standard weather reports during our trip to help plan our movement, campsite selection, and rain-fly decisions. The weather reports also helped us coordinate with the pilots for pick-up. These are simple to download, meaningfully detailed, and easy to read on the device. However, I wish each report contained an indication of where it originated from. Quite obviously our reports didn't come from the middle of the wilderness, so which NOAA station created it? 3. To communicate with the pilots on our extraction date, I paired the InReach with my phone to simplify the text entry. The Garmin mobile app makes this pretty easy. This gave us near real-time communication with the crew as they were planning to come pick us up. They were able to ask questions about local wind and wave conditions, and we were able to respond with that information and our lat/lon. No complaints about this feature at all. (You can perform this function without linking to a phone, but be prepared to enter characters slowly, worse than texting in 2004.) We did not use the tracking feature while in Alaska, but I did test tracking while wandering on some trails at home, and this works well. If you send friends/family a link to your Garmin page, they can keep near real-time track of where you're at. (Note the potential costs associated with tracking.) I also did not use the InReach as my primary GPS device, because I already have another Garmin GPS that I'm comfortable with. (Consider buying the larger InReach device if you're also in the market for a GPS for navigation. I think the InReach mini will work, but will be less handy.) Battery Life: We were in the backcountry for 7 days. We only turned the device on when we needed it. We used it 3 to 4 times per day, an average "session" being 10 minutes, but our maximum "session" lasted about an hour. The battery never got below 90%. So if this type of use describes your intended use, you could easily spend a few weeks in the bush on a single charge with room to spare for an SOS situation. If you turn on tracking, use the device for continuous navigation, or forget to turn it off, well, you know, plan to burn through the battery faster. Overall, I think the InReach mini is a handy little device that can help with several logistics tasks on true backcountry adventures. It's also a pocket-sized risk mitigation plan in case of injuries, illnesses, etc. I wish the subscription plans were a little more flexible for the occasional wilderness trip. But I simply decided to buy one plan down from what my theoretical sweet spot was, and our entire adventure in Alaska cost me maybe $0.20 in overages. Decent value. Note: If you are at all intimidated by using this device, know that Garmin offers occasional online seminars, and they publish recordings of the previous ones. It's easy to get assistance from Garmin for new users. Also, there are tons of good YouTube videos on these devices. So don't avoid purchasing one simply due to a little tech anxiety. I think it's a pretty simple device to use, and support exists.
By
Five Stars
Tiny and sturdy
In so many ways this product is really quite amazing. Whether you’re a hiker, a pilot or spend time offshore this is simply a must have. While I give this a 4 out of 5 it really boils down to that last con. There is some room for improvement most of which could be easily done by Garmin through OTA updates. Pros: - this gives you your GPS location, heading and speed - you can send and receive messages including your location and track - it’s lightweight - I forgot to grab it leaving it running for a day and it still had lots of battery - you can connect to an app on your phone for a far better experience than you would get with a larger device and integrated screen Cons - while the maps are useful for hiking, they’re fairly useless offshore - maps are limited and generally lacking outside the US - messages can take an obnoxious amount of time to send. Don’t expect it to be as quick as sending an email or sms. - this only works with a monthly subscription which is a little more expensive than it should be. - perhaps one of my biggest issues though is that this uses the older USB Micro adapter instead of the newer USB C so you’ll be stuck with an extra usb cable for charging on those multi day trips.
By
Four Stars
A must have for an active lifestyle
My wife sewed a loop on my Tourmaster motorcycle jacket (at the shoulder) to clip this device, and I now use this tracker to give her an easy method of determining my progress and safety. I just turn it on, and it automatically starts sending my location to a private link. When she wants to know how I'm doing, she just clicks the web address we loaded in her phone, types in my password, and she can see my location and my past track. I bought the service that provides a tracking point every two minutes, and there is almost no lag time in seeing the results on screen. BTW, it turns off if you don't want to be tracked, but why buy it if that's the case? Of note, I didn't receive anything from Garmin (or anyone else) for this review. I just think that this product is really useful for a biker...especially if you ride a lot of backroads (with no cell service) like I do. Update: I just used this device on a motorcycle camping trip to Seneca Rocks, WV. There is no cell service anywhere in this area (quiet zone), but I was able to text home via satellite. Moreover, I was able to type my texts using my linked Garmin Zumo XT (navigator) keyboard.
By
Five Stars
Athlete Tracking
My loved ones use this to keep track of me when I'm away from civilization. For me, the battery lasted on a four-day trip and I didn't turn it off. In hindsight, I could have turned it off at night, when I wasn't moving. It's a tiny device and has three buttons (not counting the power button and the SOS button), so the messaging interface is laborious. Common functions (turning on, locking the screen, starting/stopping tracking) are easy to access. Other functions quickly become annoying. For my needs (sending breadcrumbs, and hopefully SOS that I'll never need), it works great, is light, and is compact. I had to create an account on the Garmin site. So far, no spam, but it has only been a couple weeks. The web application isn't very good. Setting up a "collection," and getting side-by-side comparisons for subscription plans aren't easy. And then you have to set up ANOTHER account to share your track(s). The good news is that if you start charging the InReach mini then set up your accounts, the device will be fully charged before you finish navigating the websites and configuring your account. I have only taken it on a handful of trips (land, sea, and air) so far. When reviewing my tracks, I have had good coverage on all trips.
By
Four Stars
limited use, but works great
I've had this device a little over two weeks now, and run a bunch of different tests, and I really like it. I've seen some negative reviews of this device regarding how long it takes to get a satellite fix, sometimes as long as 20 minutes. I my testing I've averaged about 10-15 minutes, which I find perfectly acceptable. This is way slower than a lot of other GPS devices, but let me explain what I think is going on, and why I actually like this feature. I've been doing back country hiking for many years. About 15 years ago my Dad bought me a handheld Garmin GPS device that could hold all sorts of map types and show an accurate location to it's grainy LCD display, and it took about 5 minutes to get a fix. My folks worried because I mainly navigated with topo maps and a compass, and they thought adding GPS to my kit would help keep me out of trouble. It did it's job well, but very primitive and clunky. Today, my phone gets a GPS fix on my location about as soon as I take it out of my pocket and open Google Maps. Here's the thing I've noticed, and it comes down to accuracy. That old Garmin device needed 13 satellites before it would lock onto a position, if memory serves me, and it was pretty spot on. My phone, using Google Maps, has enough accuracy to know I'm home, a circular error of probably 100 feet. My smartwatch also has GPS, but takes about a minute to get a good GPS fix, but it will tell me I'm in my driveway, with a circular error of probability of about 30 feet. I think this boils down to how many satellites are observed, and more satellites means better location finding. My inReach Mini will show my location as the driver side of the tailgate on my pickup truck, which is parked on the east side of my driveway. It takes a while, but that's impressive, and I'm guessing it takes a bit of time to find enough satellites to get a fix that good. This is supposed to be, at least in part, as a rescue device. Hit the SOS button, and the cavalry comes. I'd much prefer the cavalry know that I'm the most exact point possible compared to the alternative. Texting isn't the same speed as using my phone on an LTE network, and given the physics of satellite communications, it is expected, but it does do the job. The app that works with the inReach isn't what anyone would describe as sexy, but in my experience it works. I look at it like a tool, not an entertainment app. It's ugly & clunky like a pipe wrench, but it will get the job done.
By
Five Stars
Amazing product that can save my life
Strapped this on my (young-adult) kid who went hiking in Bolivia !! We were able to stay in touch using the app installed on a phone (iPhone, in this case). We could follow the progress of the hike through a website that was continually updated by the device. The battery lasted pretty well but we sent usb chargers, too. It is amazing that as long as this device can see the sky it can provide a way to be in touch anywhere in the world via text and the Garmin website. You need a subscription to the satellite network. We also bought insurance, too. I don't have links handy but there are LOTS of resources on line to help you determine which satellite subscription level to buy and how the insurance works. Also (maybe this is useful to someone), don't confuse this with a satellite enabled phone. You can only use this device for tracking the carrier on the Garmin website and/or sending text via an app installed on a cell phone (so you need your cell phone, too). If you don't have a cell phone, you can send texts (on the fly or pre-written texts) from the device itself but it is not as user-friendly as your cell phone.
By
Five Stars
Works extremely well, very impressed
I use this a emergency backup when I don't have service, just for peace of mind. It works great for most things, but I haven't been able to get the firmware update or sync to work. The Bluetooth doesn't work, either, so I can't connect it to my phone. But I'm able to send messages and other use other satellite functions. It's overpriced, but if you're outside cell service regularly then it's worth having.
By
Five Stars
Great product
I hope I never have to use the SOS function on this, but I have confidence that it will work should I need it. I do a lot of solo hiking, and having the InReach allows me to spend more time enjoying the trip and less worrying about "what if". Friends and family appreciate being able to keep an eye on my progress. I've tested all of the other functionality aside from SOS, and it was flawless. It paired immediately with my Garmin Forerunner 945, so I can access most of the functions with the InReach still attached to my pack strap. Setup was easy. Dan Hikes on YouTube has a great video to help you pick a monitoring plan.
By
Four Stars
Works great (mostly)
I had the Explorer SE, but it wasn’t something I could easily fit in a bike jersey or sailing shorts. Considering that I pair any device with my phone, which I do carry most places, all I need the inReach for is as a kind of “satellite access point” or for the SOS function. The mini definitely fits the bill. I love the form factor. Also, while the screen is tiny, the readout itself is fine and the buttons and menus are intuitive. My near vision could be better, though, so for comfort’s sake I bumped the illumination to torch mode (100%). Problem solved. Side note - I thought a long time about black or orange. I felt that the black looked classier, while the orange made it look like a toy (I.e., cheap) in the very small form factor. Since the device will always be on my person when I am on the trail or out on the water, I did not need the orange color to make it stand out (if that even would have mattered), so black was the way to go.
By
Five Stars
I am happy to invest in this!
This primer catcher tool is very helpful. I feel this is one of the greatest inventions of the time and is very helpful and catching the falling paints or primers. The durability of this primer catcher is also very reliable and it is of quite good quality overall. It reduces the due to falling paints.
By
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